Chicorée

A verbal and visual diary of everything

24 note

Moon Garden

A moon garden is a garden specifically designed to be enjoyed by the light of the moon at night. It is typically planted with flowers and plants that are at their best after the sun has set. Some have blooms that only open at night, some release their fragrance into the cool night air and others simply have lovely silver foliage and white flowers that glow softly in the moonlight. Plants that resonate with the energy of the moon are also welcome in a moon garden, although they usually meet the other criteria as well.

A moon garden is a wonderful idea for night owls, for people who work long hours during the day and only get to enjoy their gardens at night, and, of course, for moon-worshipers!

Design Elements

To fully enjoy your moon garden, you will want a comfortable bench or perhaps a wooden swing to rest on in the cool of the evening.

The sound of a waterfall trickling through your plantings will provide a soothing backdrop to your evening meditation.

Consider adding a few (but not too many) glow-in-the dark garden decor pieces to help you navigate your way through the garden in the darkness and also to add a bit of magical flare. Consider creating stepping stones with glow in the dark pebbles or solar mason jars along your path to light your way.

Suggested Plants

Please note that many of these plants are poisonous and some are invasive. It is up to you to decide whether and where to plant them and to manage them responsibly. Please read the individual plant’s page carefully and do further research from other sources before purchasing and planting any of these.

Flowers that Open at Night:

evening primrose, night blooming cereus, night phlox ”Midnight Candy”, moonflower, night blooming daylily ”Moon Frolic” or “Toltec Sundail”, night blooming water lily, night gladiolus, Casablanca lily, Nottingham catchfly, Four O’Clock, Dragon Fruit, Dutchman’s pipe cactus, night-blooming jasmine, angel’s trumpet, Evening Stock, Nicotiana/flowering tobacco

Flowers that Smell Their Best at Night:

Night Phlox, Night Blooming Jasmine, Evening Stock, Four O’Clock, August Lily, Moonflower, Tuberose, Garden Heliotrope, Mock Orange, Honeysuckle

Plants that Look Great in the Moonlight:

yucca, lily of the valley, magnolia, dogwood, lamb’s ear, sage

Plants that resonate with lunar energy:

Alder, Evening Primrose, Lemon, Maple, marsh mallow, Monarda, Mugwort, Poppy, Rosemary, Water Lily,

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9 note

Gardening by the Moon

Gardening according to the phases of the moon is an ancient practice. Those of us who garden as an expression of our spirituality and our connection with both the Earth and our ancestors may wish to incorporate the moon phases and the lunar calendar into our gardening.

There are generally two things that are considered when gardening by the moon. The first is the moon phase and the second is the astrological house the moon is in. Read on to find out how they each affect your plants differently.

Gardening by Moon Phase

The New Moon is the best time for starting above ground crops, leafy crops. The moon’s gravitational pull increases moisture at this time and encourages seeds to sprout. The increasing light of the moon encourages the growth of leaves. This provides good, strong, balanced growth both above the ground and below. During this phase, plant spinach, cabbage, lettuce, broccoli, cauliflower, mustard, celery, dill and other herbs and grain crops.

During the Second Quarter, the moon’s gravitational pull is slightly weaker but the moon’s light is growing in strength. This is the best time to plant above ground fruiting crops like squash, tomatoes, peppers, peas and beans, melons, etc. The best time for planting during this phase is 3-4 days before the full moon.

If you are mowing, trimming or pruning to encourage growth, the best time to do this is during the first half of the lunar cycle.

The Full Moon has the strongest gravitational pull encouraging moisture to rise up in the soil but its light will fade so it will encourage below ground growth stronger than above ground growth. Therefore, this is the best time to plant root crops such as potatoes, beets, carrots, radishes, turnips, onions, garlic and potatoes as well as bulbs like daffodils, tulips and crocus. It is also a great time for transplanting those starts or dividing and transplanting perennials.

The Fourth Quarter has the weakest gravitational pull and decreasing light. Therefore, it is best not to plant anything at this time. Instead, use this time to harvest, cultivate, weed, destroy pests and mow and prune to discourage further growth.

Planting by Astrological Signs

As the moon moves through the houses of the zodiac it lends its energy to various tasks, including gardening. Generally speaking, the water signs (Cancer, Pisces, Scorpio) are the most fertile and the best for planting just about anything, but especially leafy greens and annuals. The earth signs (Taurus, Virgo and Capricorn) are best for planting root crops and transplanting. The air signs (Aquarius, Gemini and Libra) and fire signs (Aries, Leo and Sagittarius) are best for weeding, harvesting, digging, cultivation, mowing, pruning and destroying pests.

Leggi tutto …

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16 note

Faerie Gardening

Whether or not you believe in fairies, a fairy garden is a charming addition to your landscaping. Even if fairies don’t make an appearance, this themed garden will attract other welcome visitors such as hummingbirds, butterflies and bees.

Begin by selecting the proper location for your garden. The ideal location is a spot some distance from the house that gets dappled shade and not a great deal of foot traffic.

Select plants with delicate, nodding flowers or leaves and pleasing fragrances. It is always best to use native varieties when you can get them.
columbine, snapdragons, foxglove, lady’s slipper, nasturtium, fern, heather, pansy, peony, violets, poppy, irises, mints, thyme and roses are excellent choices.

Miniature versions of these are also suitable. Wooly thyme and corsican mint make lovely resting places and miniature roses look charming among fairy statuary.

Shrubberies provide protection and a lovely backdrop. Try rosebushes, blackberry, barberry and holly.

Trees can also provide shade and welcome protection to fairies and wildlife. Try elder, hawthorn, oak, ash and birch.

A fairy garden should never be a manicured space with everything in its place. You should give your plants the opportunity to do what comes naturally… to get a natural affect. It may take a few seasons for this to happen, but the wait is worth it.

If you can, incorporate water into your garden plan. A bird bath, a small pond or a fountain or waterfall will fit the bill. If you use a bird bath, use the sort that rests on the ground rather than putting one on a pedestal.

Decorate your garden with fairy themed statuary. Select elegant or whimsical pieces. Little faces peering out of the ground or out of your trees, stepping stones with fairy images, or other pieces portraying fairies, gnomes or other mythical creatures are all appropriate. Shiny wind chimes, wind dancers and gazing balls will add to the effect. Include hiding places, such as tree stumps, piles of stones or mounds of soil or broken or tipped flowerpots.

You may also wish to include a spot where you will place offerings and gifts for the fairy folk. A large, flat rock is suitable for this or you may wish to use an ornamental bowl of some sort, or a large seashell. Use your imagination and creativity!

When your garden is complete, be sure to invite the local fairies to come enjoy your garden. You may wish to do a formal welcoming or dedication ceremony or simply focus your conscious intent as you work.

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32 note

Butterfly Gardening

Many Pagans consider nature to be sacred and enjoy inviting the wild creatures of our neighborhood to share our gardens with us. A butterfly garden is an excellent way to do this. With just a little extra work and consideration in the selection of your plants, you can create a haven for butterflies that will also attract bees, birds and many other delightful creatures. Their energy will in turn transform your garden into a delightful haven that brings comfort to you and anyone else who spends time in it.

Select a spot for your garden that is sunny, but sheltered from the wind. The garden should get 5-6 hours of sunlight per day. Butterflies like to be in the warm sun, but don’t like to fight winds. Butterflies are cold-blooded creatures and need to regulate their body temperature externally. Thus, it is helpful to provide a few flat rocks in sunny places for the butterflies to rest on and sun themselves.

If you use pesticides in your garden, you will kill the butterflies and caterpillars, it’s as simple as that. Resist the urge and go organic. It’s better for you in the long run. If the caterpillars are eating your favorite plant, plant more! Or you could look into a book on the subject and find another plant the caterpillars will eat and move them.

Butterflies, like everybody, need to drink. You can provide a water source for them by keeping a shallow mudpuddle moist, maintaining a shallow fountain, or just putting out a little dish with water in it for them. The key word here is shallow. I’ve lost caterpillars to drowning in empty pots that I let fill up with rain water. It was very sad.

Some people like to put out butterfly feeders. This is really not necessary, but it can be fun, and it doesn’t hurt anything. The best thing to use in the feeders is just plain old sugar water and the best feeder I’ve seen was an inverted frizbee with a little sugar water inside. Setting out pieces of overripe fruit, such as apple, banana and citrus fruit, will also help keep your butterflies happy.

Butterfly houses will give your butterflies a safe place to hide out of reach of predators. You can find a nice wooden house and a alot more information about butterflies at many gardening centers. They are also reasonably easy to make.

Inviting butterflies to your garden can mean caterpillars, so be prepared to share. Plant a variety of plants that caterpillars like to encourage them not to eat all your treasured herbs. Soon, you’ll have a new batch of butterflies to enjoy!

Some plants that caterpillars eat are:

Parsley, Dill, Milkweed, Fennel, Hackberry, violets, Clover, Snapdragons, Queen Anne’s Lace, Joe-Pye-weed, Peas, Fruit Trees, alfalfa and more…

Adult butterflies eat nectar, for the most part, so you’ll want to fill your garden with long-blooming, fragrant flowers. When planting flowers to attract butterflies, you’ll want to plant flowers with varying blooming times to keep the butterflies attracted all season long.

If you have limited space and/or experience, a good, simple combination for a starter garden that pleases both adult butterflies and their larvae is – Buddleia, violet, verbena, parsley, dill, fennel, milkweed, coneflower, lantana, cosmos, and zinnias. You can expand your garden as the years go by and you get more experienced and adventurous.

If you would like to invite specific types of butterflies to your garden, select your plants with those species in mind.

Types of butterflies and their preferences:

American Snout
Larva- Hackberry
Adult- Aster, Dogbane, dogwood, goldenrod, pepperbush

Anise Swallowtail
Larva- Queen Anne’s Lace
Adult- Buddleia, joe-pye-weed

Baltimore Checkerspot
Larva- Turtlehead, false foxglove, plantain
Adult- Milkweed, Vibernum, Wild rose

Black Swallowtail
Larva- Parsley, Dill, Fennel
Adult- Aster, Buddleia, joe-pye-weed, alfalfa

Buckeye Butterfly
Larva- Snapdragon, loosestrife
Adult- Aster, Milkweed, chickory, coreopsis, carpetweed

Clouded Sulphur
Larva- Clover
Adult- Goldenrod, Grape Hyacinth, Marigold

Cloudless Sulphur
Larva- Cassia, apple, Clover
Adult- Zinnia, Butterfly bush, cosmos, cushion mum

Comma
Larva- Nettle, Elm, Hops
Adult- Rotting fruit & sap, butterfly bush, dandelion

Common Checkered Skipper
Larva- Mallow, hollyhock
Adult- Shepherd’s needles, fleabane, aster, red clover

Common Sulphur
Larva- Vetch
Adult- Aster, dogbane, goldenrod

Common Wood Nymph
Larva- Purple top grass
Adult- Purple Coneflower

Eastern Pygmy Blue
Larva- Glasswort
Adult- Salt Bush

Eastern Tailed Blue
Larva- Clover, peas
Adult- Dogbane

Falcate Orangetip
Larva- Rock cress, mustard
Adult- Mustard, Strawberry, chickweed, violet

Great Swallowtail
Larva- Citrus trees, prickly ash
Adult- lantana, japanese honeysuckle, milkweed, lilac, goldenrod, azalea, Joe Pye Weed, Buddleia

Gorgone Checkerspot
Larva- Sunflower
Adult- Sunflower, goldenrod

Gray Hair Streak
Larva- Mallow, Hollyhock, Clover, Alfalfa
Adult- Thistle, ice plant

Great Spangled Fritillary
Larva- violet
Adult- Ironweed, milkweed, black-eyed susan, verbena, thistle

Gulf Fritillary
Larva- Pentas, Passion Vine
Adult- Joe Pye Weed

Hackberry Emperor
Larva- Hackberry
Adult- Sap, rotting fruit, carrion, dung

Little Glassywing
Larva- Purpletop Grass
Adult- Dogbane, zinnia

Little Yellow
Larva- Cassia, clover
Adult- Clover

Monarch
Larva- milkweed
Adult- milkweed, butterfly bush, goldenrod, thistle, ironweed, mints, dogbane, buddleia

Mourning Cloak
Larva- willow, elm, poplar, aspen, birch, hackberry, wild rose, nettle
Adult- Rotting fruit & sap, butterfly bush, milkweed, shasta daisy, dogbane

Orange Sulphur
Larva- Vetch, alfalfa, clover
Adult- Alfalfa, Aster, Clover, Verbena

Orange-barred Sulphur
Larva- Cassia
Adult- Many plants

Painted Lady
Larva- daisy, hollyhock, Everlasting, Burdock
Adult- Goldenrod, aster, zinnia, butterfly bush, milkweed, dogbane, mallow, privet, vetch

Pearl Crescent
Larva- Aster
Adult- Dogbane

Pipevine Swallowtail
Larva- Dutchman’s pipe, pipevine
Adult- Buddleia

Polydamus Swallowtail
Larva- Pipevine
Adult- Buddleia

Queen
Larva- Milkweed
Adult- Milkweed, beggar-tick, daisy

Question Mark
Larva- Hackberry, Elm, Nettle, Basswood
Adult- Aster, Milkweed, Sweet Pepperbush

Red Admiral
Larva- nettle
Adult- rotting fruit and sap, daisy, aster, goldenrod, butterfly bush, milkweed, stonecrop, clover, dandelion, goldenrod, mallow

Red-spotted Purple
Larva- Black cherry, willow, poplar
Adult- Privet, poplar

Silver Spotted Skipper
Larva- Black locust, wisteria
Adult- Dogbane, privet, clover, thistle, winter cress

Silvery Checkerspot
Larva- Sunflower
Adult- Cosmos, blanket flower, phlox, zinnia, marigold

Sleepy Orange
Larva- Cassia, Clover
Adult- Blue Porter, Beggar tick, aster

Spicebush Swallowtail
Larva- Spicebush, Sassafrass
Adult- Dogbane, joe-pye-weed, Buddleia

Spring Azure
Larva- Dogwood, Vibernum, Blueberry, Spirea, apple
Adult- blackberry, cherry, dogwood, forgetmenot, holly

Tawny Emperor
Larva- Hackberry
Adult- Tree sap, rotting fruit, carrion

Tiger Swallowtail
Larva- cherry, ash, birch, tulip tree, lilac, willow
Adult- Butterfly bush, milkweed, Japanese honeysuckle, phlox, lilac, ironweed, joe pye weed, buddleia

Varigated Fritillary
Larva- violet, passion vine
Adult- joe-pye-weed

Viceroy
Larva- willow, poplar, fruit trees
Adult- rotting fruit, sap, aster, goldenrod, milkweed, thistle, beggar-tick

Western Tailed Blue
Larva- Clover, peas
Adult- Legumes

White Admiral
Larva- Birch, Willow, poplar, honeysuckle
Adult- aphid honeydew, bramble blossom

Zabulon Skipper
Larva- Purpletop grass
Adult- blackberry, vetch, milkweed, buttonbush, thistle

Zebra Longwing
Larva- passion-vine
Adult- Verbena, Lantana, shepherd’s needle

Zebra Swallowtail
Larva- Pawpaw
Adult- Dogbane, joe-pye-weed, buddleia, privet, blackberry

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156 note

General Information
There are many varieties of roses. The wild forms have five petals and are usually white to pink. They grow in a bushy habit and have thorns and oval-shaped serrated leaves. Cultivated varieties usually have double blooms, may be bushy, sprawling or climbing.
It’s important to note when purchasing roses that not all roses have a strong smell.
Roses in the Garden
Roses like full sun and do not like to be crowded. They should be planted in well-drained, well-balanced soil. They should be watered every day that it doesn’t rain for the first two weeks after planting and then twice a week thereafter. They should be pruned in the early spring before blooms appear down to about one third. Cut flowers to keep the plant producing. Neem oil spray can help reduce problems with pests and fungus. Compost around the base of the plant in the fall.
Miniature roses can be grown indoors or out, but are more delicate than full-sized roses. When grown outdoors they need some sort of cover to protect them from the cold in the winter. Burying them with leaves can help. You may also wish to dig them up and bring them inside for the winter. This also adds nutrients to the soil.
Plant roses near chives, feverfew, garlic, geranium, marigold, onion or parsley for best yields.
Harvesting and Storage
Cut roses as they bloom to keep the plant producing. They are great in bouquets and lest awhile in a vase. You can hang the whole flower upside down to dry it and it will look great in dried arrangements. The petals and leaves can be pulled off the plant and spread on paper to dry and stored in a jar.
History and Folklore
Roses have been cultivated for over 5,000 years. There are 150 natural named species worldwide and thousands more cultivars. The Chinese were the first to cultivate roses and begin hybridizing them.
In the Iliad, Homer mentions that Hector’s body was anointed with rose oil after he was killed by Achilles. The Greek poet Anacreon says that the foam that dripped from the body of Aphrodite when she emerged from the sea turned into white roses, later, when she is mourning over the body of her lover Adonis, her tears turn a white rose red. Roses are also associated with Eros, another Greek love God. Sappho called the rose the Queen of the Flowers.
Roses were also important to the Romans. Large public rose gardens were established by the nobility. Both Horace and Pliny wrote advice on the proper growing of roses. They were used as for medicine, fragrance and as confetti at celebrations. In Roman mythology, roses are associated with Flora, Bacchus, Vertumnus, Hymen, Venus and Cupid. Roman brides and grooms were crowned with roses and they were scattered at the feet of the victorious.
In Christian folklore, the red rose has symbolized the blood and suffering of Christ, the five petals representing his five wounds. Roses have also been used to represent Mary and the purity and motherhood associated with her.
In Muslim folklore, one of Muhammed’s wives was accused of adultery. He gave her a bouquet of red roses and told her to throw them into a pool. They turned yellow, indicating her guilt. Another story says that the first rose came a drop of sweat from Muhammed’s brow.
In Jewish folklore, a man once accused a woman of a crime in retribution for refusing his advances. She was to be burned at the stake. Miraculously, the fire does not kill her, but killed him. From his ashes red roses grow, symbolizing his treachery. From the ashes at her feet grow white roses, symbolizing her innocence.
In England, if a petal falls as a rose is being cut, bad luck is sure to follow!
In Italy, only rosebuds, or partially closed roses may be given as gifts. To give a fully open rose to another marks them for death!
Magical Use
Roses are associated with Aphrodite, Adonis and Eros.
Rosewater is a protective agent worn on clothes.
Rose petals can be added to charms against the evil eye.
White roses worn at weddings will bring happiness and security to the couple.
Roses are used traditionally in love spells. It is great in incense and potpourri. Thorns can be used to mark wax figures.
Culinary Use
Rose petals can be eaten on salads, in sandwiches or made into tea or jam. Rose hips also make a delicious tea and are high in vitamin C. The leaves can also be made into tea.
Household Use
Roses look great in dried or fresh arrangements and they smell great. Excellent for potpourri. Dab a drop of rose oil on all your light bulbs to keep your house smelling sweet. Rose hips can be strung on a string and used as garland.
Medical Use
The best roses for medicinal use are fragrant and deep red or cabbage roses.
A tincture is used for weak stomach and for hemorrhaging. 1 pint boiling water to 1 ounce of rose petals. Add 15 drops of oil of vitriol and 1/2 cup sugar. Stir till sugar is dissolved and the mixture is nice and red. Strain. Take three or four spoonfuls daily.
Rose flavored honey is good for coughs and sore throats. Rose honey can be made by pounding the fresh petals and boiling them with honey.
Rose vinegar is good for headaches caused by being out in the sun too long. Steep the petals in the vinegar for several days, do not boil. Apply a cloth wetted with the vinegar to the forehead.
Rosewater ointment is good for chapped skin and abrasions.
Contemporary color meanings
Red - Love, respect
Deep pink - Gratitude, appreciation
Light pink - Admiration, sympathy, puppy love, maidenhood
White - Reverence, humility, innocence
Yellow - Joy, gladness, lifelong friendship
Orange - Enthusiasm, desire
Red & yellow blends - Gaiety, joviality
Pale blended tones - Sociability, friendship

General Information

There are many varieties of roses. The wild forms have five petals and are usually white to pink. They grow in a bushy habit and have thorns and oval-shaped serrated leaves. Cultivated varieties usually have double blooms, may be bushy, sprawling or climbing.

It’s important to note when purchasing roses that not all roses have a strong smell.

Roses in the Garden

Roses like full sun and do not like to be crowded. They should be planted in well-drained, well-balanced soil. They should be watered every day that it doesn’t rain for the first two weeks after planting and then twice a week thereafter. They should be pruned in the early spring before blooms appear down to about one third. Cut flowers to keep the plant producing. Neem oil spray can help reduce problems with pests and fungus. Compost around the base of the plant in the fall.

Miniature roses can be grown indoors or out, but are more delicate than full-sized roses. When grown outdoors they need some sort of cover to protect them from the cold in the winter. Burying them with leaves can help. You may also wish to dig them up and bring them inside for the winter. This also adds nutrients to the soil.

Plant roses near chives, feverfew, garlic, geranium, marigold, onion or parsley for best yields.

Harvesting and Storage

Cut roses as they bloom to keep the plant producing. They are great in bouquets and lest awhile in a vase. You can hang the whole flower upside down to dry it and it will look great in dried arrangements. The petals and leaves can be pulled off the plant and spread on paper to dry and stored in a jar.

History and Folklore

Roses have been cultivated for over 5,000 years. There are 150 natural named species worldwide and thousands more cultivars. The Chinese were the first to cultivate roses and begin hybridizing them.

In the Iliad, Homer mentions that Hector’s body was anointed with rose oil after he was killed by Achilles. The Greek poet Anacreon says that the foam that dripped from the body of Aphrodite when she emerged from the sea turned into white roses, later, when she is mourning over the body of her lover Adonis, her tears turn a white rose red. Roses are also associated with Eros, another Greek love God. Sappho called the rose the Queen of the Flowers.

Roses were also important to the Romans. Large public rose gardens were established by the nobility. Both Horace and Pliny wrote advice on the proper growing of roses. They were used as for medicine, fragrance and as confetti at celebrations. In Roman mythology, roses are associated with Flora, Bacchus, Vertumnus, Hymen, Venus and Cupid. Roman brides and grooms were crowned with roses and they were scattered at the feet of the victorious.

In Christian folklore, the red rose has symbolized the blood and suffering of Christ, the five petals representing his five wounds. Roses have also been used to represent Mary and the purity and motherhood associated with her.

In Muslim folklore, one of Muhammed’s wives was accused of adultery. He gave her a bouquet of red roses and told her to throw them into a pool. They turned yellow, indicating her guilt. Another story says that the first rose came a drop of sweat from Muhammed’s brow.

In Jewish folklore, a man once accused a woman of a crime in retribution for refusing his advances. She was to be burned at the stake. Miraculously, the fire does not kill her, but killed him. From his ashes red roses grow, symbolizing his treachery. From the ashes at her feet grow white roses, symbolizing her innocence.

In England, if a petal falls as a rose is being cut, bad luck is sure to follow!

In Italy, only rosebuds, or partially closed roses may be given as gifts. To give a fully open rose to another marks them for death!

Magical Use

Roses are associated with Aphrodite, Adonis and Eros.

Rosewater is a protective agent worn on clothes.

Rose petals can be added to charms against the evil eye.

White roses worn at weddings will bring happiness and security to the couple.

Roses are used traditionally in love spells. It is great in incense and potpourri. Thorns can be used to mark wax figures.

Culinary Use

Rose petals can be eaten on salads, in sandwiches or made into tea or jam. Rose hips also make a delicious tea and are high in vitamin C. The leaves can also be made into tea.

Household Use

Roses look great in dried or fresh arrangements and they smell great. Excellent for potpourri. Dab a drop of rose oil on all your light bulbs to keep your house smelling sweet. Rose hips can be strung on a string and used as garland.

Medical Use

The best roses for medicinal use are fragrant and deep red or cabbage roses.

A tincture is used for weak stomach and for hemorrhaging. 1 pint boiling water to 1 ounce of rose petals. Add 15 drops of oil of vitriol and 1/2 cup sugar. Stir till sugar is dissolved and the mixture is nice and red. Strain. Take three or four spoonfuls daily.

Rose flavored honey is good for coughs and sore throats. Rose honey can be made by pounding the fresh petals and boiling them with honey.

Rose vinegar is good for headaches caused by being out in the sun too long. Steep the petals in the vinegar for several days, do not boil. Apply a cloth wetted with the vinegar to the forehead.

Rosewater ointment is good for chapped skin and abrasions.

Contemporary color meanings

Red - Love, respect

Deep pink - Gratitude, appreciation

Light pink - Admiration, sympathy, puppy love, maidenhood

White - Reverence, humility, innocence

Yellow - Joy, gladness, lifelong friendship

Orange - Enthusiasm, desire

Red & yellow blends - Gaiety, joviality

Pale blended tones - Sociability, friendship

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Cute White Flying Butterfly