Chicorée

A verbal and visual diary of everything

57 note

General information
There are about 500 species of violet around the world. Most are small perennial herbs, but there are some annuals and shrubs in the family as well. Most have heart-shaped, scalloped leaves (though some are palmate) and the flowers have four upswept petals (like a sail) at the top and one forward thrusting petal (like the keel of the boat) at the bottom. Flowers can be any shade of purple, yellow or white often with a contrasting throat. Pansies come in a huge variety of colors and are often multicolored.
Propagation

Violas and pansies can be easily raised from seed, from cuttings or purchased as bedding plants from your local nursery. There are a huge variety available. Many people consider violets to be weeds in their yard and may let you come in and dig them up if you ask. Plant them in an area of dappled sunshine and mulch well to keep the roots cool.
Violets and pansies are very cold and shade tolerant, they don’t like heat much but will come back again after the heat has passed. Pansies are known for blooming in the spring and then again in the fall.
Violas are used as food by many caterpillars, so be sure to plant enough to share and enjoy the show when the butterflies come to lay their eggs.
Harvesting & Storage

Pinch off blooms as they appear and candy to preserve indefinitely.
Magical Attributes

Violets are affiliated with the planet Venus OR Pluto and are associated with the nymphs of ancient Greek myth as, in the Odyssey,Homer says that Ogygia is “beautiful land of parsley and violets.” Violets are also associated with death and rebirth through the story of Attis.
Violets are useful in love spells and may be carried as an amulet to increase one’s luck in love. Try combining them with lavender for enhanced effect.
Also useful in spells for protection, wishes, peace and healing.
In the language of flowers, violets represent faithfulness.
Healing Attributes

Violas are rich in antioxidants and vitamin C and A. They also make a lovely, soothing tea that is used in Chinese medicine.
Culinary Use

Violets and pansies taste floral and a bit celery like. They are great additions to salads and lovely decorations on cookies and cakes. They can easily be candied by painting them with a bit of egg white and sprinkling them with sugar or dipping them in melted syrup.Viola odorata is most often used for this, but any variety is suitable though they may not be as flavorful. Pansies are lovely candied and used as cake decorations.
Violet syrup is used to flavor violet scones and viola essence flavors many liquors. Both the ancient Greeks and the Romans used violets to make wine ”Vinum Violatum”

General information

There are about 500 species of violet around the world. Most are small perennial herbs, but there are some annuals and shrubs in the family as well. Most have heart-shaped, scalloped leaves (though some are palmate) and the flowers have four upswept petals (like a sail) at the top and one forward thrusting petal (like the keel of the boat) at the bottom. Flowers can be any shade of purple, yellow or white often with a contrasting throat. Pansies come in a huge variety of colors and are often multicolored.

Propagation

Violas and pansies can be easily raised from seed, from cuttings or purchased as bedding plants from your local nursery. There are a huge variety available. Many people consider violets to be weeds in their yard and may let you come in and dig them up if you ask. Plant them in an area of dappled sunshine and mulch well to keep the roots cool.

Violets and pansies are very cold and shade tolerant, they don’t like heat much but will come back again after the heat has passed. Pansies are known for blooming in the spring and then again in the fall.

Violas are used as food by many caterpillars, so be sure to plant enough to share and enjoy the show when the butterflies come to lay their eggs.

Harvesting & Storage

Pinch off blooms as they appear and candy to preserve indefinitely.

Magical Attributes

Violets are affiliated with the planet Venus OR Pluto and are associated with the nymphs of ancient Greek myth as, in the Odyssey,Homer says that Ogygia is “beautiful land of parsley and violets.” Violets are also associated with death and rebirth through the story of Attis.

Violets are useful in love spells and may be carried as an amulet to increase one’s luck in love. Try combining them with lavender for enhanced effect.

Also useful in spells for protection, wishes, peace and healing.

In the language of flowers, violets represent faithfulness.

Healing Attributes

Violas are rich in antioxidants and vitamin C and A. They also make a lovely, soothing tea that is used in Chinese medicine.

Culinary Use

Violets and pansies taste floral and a bit celery like. They are great additions to salads and lovely decorations on cookies and cakes. They can easily be candied by painting them with a bit of egg white and sprinkling them with sugar or dipping them in melted syrup.
Viola odorata is most often used for this, but any variety is suitable though they may not be as flavorful. Pansies are lovely candied and used as cake decorations.

Violet syrup is used to flavor violet scones and viola essence flavors many liquors. Both the ancient Greeks and the Romans used violets to make wine ”Vinum Violatum”

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39 note

Kitchen & Green Witchery

This article is not on kitchen or green ‘Wicca’, but instead focuses on how these paths fit into traditional witchcraft and stand on their own. These two paths are personalized and should not be forced to meet anyone’s requirements or outlines of how one thinks others should practice them. There are no set beliefs, structure, or ritual guidelines. How kitchen and green witchery are practiced differs for each witch. They are generally solitary paths or are part of a practitioner’s path who may also be a member of a more structured magical system such as Wicca or Druidry. However, this is not always the case and many practitioners create their own structure and system of working magic solely based on kitchen witchery, green witchery, or both.

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Kitchen Witchery

Kitchen Witchery is essentially the practice of witchcraft or folk-magic based in the kitchen or hearth of the home. The new rash of books on Kitchen Witchery may lead many to believe that it is a new practice, but magic in the kitchen and hearth goes back thousands of years and is practiced across cultures. Fire and stone ovens were thought to be magical with their transformative powers. In later centuries the large iron cauldron over the fire was the centre of the hearth – where dinners were cooked, water boiled, and medicines made.

In peasant mythology the oven had a magic dimension, and ritual propitiators presided over the rising and baking of bread. Even the curdling of milk and the fermentation of wine were mediated through ‘spirits’ or elves in certain area where the Celtic substratum had left indelible traces. The oven was where food passed from the raw to the cooked state, and like all transitional places (chimneys, doors and so on) it held a powerful magic: the rising of dough was associated with the rise and ‘growth’ of the solar orb in the sky.” (Camporesi, The Magic Harvest, p.4)

The easiest way to see how important the processes of food making and agriculture were important to our ancestors is to look at their deities. There are numerous domestic and hearth deities across cultures (too many to list here), some of the more well-known ones being Brighid, Frigga, and Hestia. The Chinese have various deities whose specific role it is to watch over the stove or hearth such as Zao-Jun and Sui-Ren. There was even a specific Roman goddess Fornax whose role was to watch over bread baking and ovens. The list of agricultural deities is even longer.

Kitchen witchery is the continuing practice of domestic magic where for the practitioner, the mundane is magical. The stove, spoons, knives, pots, and ingredients are the magical tools. The rituals of the everyday are this witch’s magic. From our ancestors’ domestic rituals of baking bread, churning butter, brewing, and preserving to today’s rituals of preparing the daily meal, brewing a cup of tea, or making medicines – the role of the domestic witch hasn’t changed much over the centuries. A kitchen witch is obsessed with food and has a gift for cooking. They might have a large store of knowledge about the folklore and properties of different foods as well any rituals or superstitions surrounding them. They may be well-versed in rituals involving feasts and eating, which also go back thousands of years for various cultures and are part of many of our traditions today at celebrations. If witchcraft is practiced by a kitchen witch, then it is most likely to be done in the kitchen or through the medium of food. The pot boiling on the stove isn’t always edible; salves, decoctions, tinctures, and even candles are all made in the kitchen.

For those who are interested in learning more, resources are provided below.

Resources

Books:

Cookbooks:

Articles:

Websites:

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Green Witchcraft

A green witch is someone who works closely with nature and her gifts. This witch is usually a wildcrafter, a herbalist, or an amazing gardner. The folklore on the spiritual and medicinal uses of plants is incredibly extensive and global, and it is this along with personal experience from which the green witch draws their knowledge and practices from. If the kitchen witch’s focus is the hearth, then the green witch’s focus is the woods and/or agriculture.

Our ancestors’ agricultural traditions and practices are steeped with folk-magic and pagan belief. Everything from planting seed, to the harvesting of crops in the fall is governed by rituals. Some farmers today still plant and reap by the phases of the moon. At various festivals the fields are sained with fire for protection, or given libations of alcoholic beverages to ensure fertility and a bountiful harvest. To our pagan ancestors, some crops were not just food but gods and were treated with reverence. In Northern Europe at the end of a harvest the last sheaf of wheat or other grain was kept and either named ‘Maiden’ or ‘Old Woman’, after Brighid or the Cailleach, and was placed in a spot of reverence, to observe the festivities after the harvest was complete. In animistic cultures each plant and tree was thought to be alive and have a spirit, and there were specific chants and songs that were sung when taking from the plants – asking their permission and giving thanks. Trees were once worshipped and if certain species were cut down without permission it was considered a crime — the penalty being death. Each tree even had its own specific deity.

Today a green witch may use some of the beliefs of our ancestors in their practices. Perhaps in methods of plant or herb collection, saining (blessing), prayers & chants, as well as the way they celebrate festivals. Most of the magic practiced by a green witch will involve herbs and plants in some way. They may also work with nature itself instead of just parts taken from it. Some green witches become guardians of a piece of land – protecting it, cleaning litter, healing wounds of the past, and working with the spirits and creatures that live on it. This is more likely the practice of a wildcrafter than a gardener. A wildcrafter harvests foods, herbs, and medicines from the wild, while also taking into account ecological ethics and responsibility. A green witch with a focus on herbalism will learn the spiritual, magical, and medicinal uses of various herbs and plants and incorporate them into their magical and healing practices. It is recommended to take a legitimate herbalist’s course if this is your desire – without the correct knowledge about preparation and dosage, one can do more harm than good with herbal medicines.

Disambiguation

This form of green witchcraft is not to be confused with Ann Moura’s books on Green Witchcraft, which are better classified as ‘Green Wicca’.

Resources

Books:

Believe it or not, books useful to the green witch can be found at your local public library. Instead of looking for occult or witchcraft books, search for books on the botany of your local area: wildcrafting, edible plants, native ethnobotany, herbalism, trees, gardening…

Books:

Websites:

Articles:

Source: Sarah Anne Lawless

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58 note

In the woods there is a cottage filled with interesting things.

The Little Fox who runs the shop is also very welcoming. Candles sit on every surface and scents fill the air. The jewelry that dangles and catches light is made with love and care. Like most of the things inside the shop it all seems one of a kind. So, come and visit The Little Fox, She really will not mind.

The Little Fox’s Cottage sells very magical things: handmade Candles, Incense, Jewelry ,Wands and many other items to suit all your metaphysical needs.

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45 note

Where have all the witches gone?
Over hill and under stone.
You shall not find them inside a house,
but if you are quiet as a mouse
and walk softly on the forest floor,
you will find them at the otherworld’s door
by grove, sea, and crossroad, places of power,
working their magic at the appointed hour.
No, you shall not find them inside a home;
in the wilds is where they roam.
Sarah Anne Lawless (Where the Witches Went)

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398 note

RedSofa is a jewellery line by Montreal-based metalsmith and designer Joanna Szkiela. 

Inspired by nature and human nature, Joanna’s work is deeply ingrained with organic references and gravitates towards decidedly feral forms. 

Her predilection for dark-hewn sterling silver, unpolished gold and rough stones is a direct homage to the sculptural yet edgy side of nature. 

RedSofa’s jewelry collections capture a magical, alchemical world with unaffected style and understated elegance.

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16 note

Lemon & Peppermint - foot scrub

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Here is a simple recipe to soften and brighten your feet for the summer season.

Sea salt abrasion is an effective method for cleaning and stimulating the skin. The lemon softens and brightens skin while the oil serves as a natural lubricant, moisturizer and skin rejuvenator. 

You can also add a few drops of your favorite essential oil to customize the scent according to your mood:  Add Lavender oil to relax, Rosemary or Peppermint oil to invigorate, Orange oil to uplift.
Ingredients: 
  • 1 cup coarse sea salt
  • 1/2 sweet almond oil
  • 1-2 tsp lemon zest
  • 3-4 drops peppermint essential oil 
Process:
Mix it all together.
NOTE: I would suggest storing it in an air-tight jar & leaving it in the fridge.

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46 note

Coconut oil - Body butter recipes

Coconut acts as a great skin moisturizer as it deeply absorbs and has small molecules which quickly penetrate into the skin. This will helps to retain the elasticity and suppleness. It not only acts as a moisturizer but also contains full of anti oxidants that will fight against the free radicals and boost up your immune system and allows the circulation of blood to all over the body.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup coconut oil
  • 1 teaspoon vitamin E oil (optional)
  • few drops of your favorite essential oils for fragrance

Process:

Put all ingredients into a mixing bowl.

Note: Do not melt the coconut oil first. It will only whip up if it’s solid.

Mix on high speed for 6-7 minutes or until whipped into a light, airy consistency.

Spoon the whipped coconut oil body butter into a glass jar and cover tightly. Store at room temperature, or in the refrigerator if your house is so warm it melts the oil.

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Cute White Flying Butterfly