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Description
Mistletoe is a parasite that grows on larger plants, usually hardwood trees, its roots drawing nutrients from the sap of the host plant. It has lanceate green leaves and a short stem with many forks and can form a large, bushy clump hanging from the host plant up to three feet long. Plants are unisexual and greenish flowers form in clumps. White, translucent, veined berries with one seed follow.
Growing Mistletoe
The juice of the berries is very sticky and allows seeds to stick to the bark of a tree. European mistletoe prefers softer deciduous trees, especially apple trees and they are frequently found on ash and hawthorn as well. American mistletoe, called Oak mistletoe is most commonly found on maple trees, but also enjoys oak.
If you wish to grow your own mistletoe, you will need to obtain fresh berries. Squish them down onto the wood on the underside of a branch of an appropriate tree so that the juice makes the seed stick.
Some people make notches in the wood for this purpose, but how much do you want this poor tree to go through? A threadlike root will form in a few days and pierce the wood, eventually finding its way into the tree itself. You should select a large, healthy tree and a branch that will get plenty of its own sunlight. The mistletoe will take up to two years to mature.
Berries can be picked in autumn. The plant should be harvested in the winter and hung to dry and stored in a paper or cloth bag with plenty of circulation.
Alternatively, you can buy bulk mistletoe herb for magical use.
History and Folklore
Mistletoe has always been considered a magical, good luck plant. Lovers who kiss beneath it will have lasting happiness and carrying a sprig on your person will ensure good luck, protection and fertility. Hanging it in the home was supposed to protect it from disease, lightening, werewolves and having your children switched with faerie changelings.
In England and Wales, farmers gave a bunch of mistletoe to the first cow that calved to ensure the health and production of the whole heard for the year.
In Scandinavia, mistletoe was a symbol of peace under which warring parties swore truce.
According to lore, Druids held mistletoe in high esteem and collected it only when they received a vision ordering them to do so, and then with great ceremony.
Since the seeds are spread through bird droppings, our observant forebearers named Mistletoe “dung-on-twig”, (the word literallytranslated is a conjugation of “birdlime” or “bird dung” and twig) believing that the plant actually sprang from the dung itself. Other beliefs held the Mistletoe grew where a tree was struck by lightening.
According to Pliny the Elder, a first century Roman Historian, described a ritual gathering of mistletoe by Gaulish Druids in his Natural History XVI as follows:

The druids – that is what they call their magicians – hold nothing more sacred than the mistletoe and a tree on which it is growing, provided it is Valonia Oak…. Mistletoe is rare and when found it is gathered with great ceremony, and particularly on the sixth day of the moon….Hailing the moon in a native word that means ‘healing all things,’ they prepare a ritual sacrifice and banquet beneath a tree and bring up two white bulls, whose horns are bound for the first time on this occasion. A priest arrayed in white vestments climbs the tree and, with a golden sickle, cuts down the mistletoe, which is caught in a white cloak. Then finally they kill the victims, praying to a god to render his gift propitious to those on whom he has bestowed it. They believe that mistletoe given in drink will impart fertility to any animal that is barren and that it is an antidote to all poisons

Mistletoe as a Yule Tradition:
Kissing under the Mistletoe originated with the Roman festival of Saturnalia. In England, kissing under the Mistletoe took place on Christmas, of course. The man must pick a berry when the kissing was complete, and once the berries were gone, there was no more kissing. The mistletoe must then be burned on the twelfth night to ensure that those who kissed under it would marry.
Throughout the Middle Ages, mistletoe was banned by the church because of its association with fertility and all of the fun debauchery that goes with it. As a substitute, holly was suggested. Even as late as the 20th century some churches did not allow people to wear mistletoe to services.
Mistletoe retained its lusty reputation, however. During the Victorian era, public displays of affection were largely frowned upon, but if you were standing under the mistletoe, you were going to get kissed. A tradition we still hold dear today.
Magical Use
Mistletoe is considered to be a plant of male energy. Indeed, the white berries are reminiscent of semen (if you imagine hard enough). It has feminine properties as well, however. It is also associated with the sun and the element of air. It is associated with the Gods Apollo,Venus, Freya, Odin and Balder.
Mistletoe is associated with both Yule and Midsummer festivals.
Use in spells to attract love, for protection, for luck while hunting, for forgiveness and reconciliation, to increase sexual potency in men and to help conceive.
It can be burned to banish unwanted spirits, laid across the threshold of the bedroom to banish unpleasant dreams, hung in the home to attract love and drive away negative influence and carried as a general protective amulet.
Its wood is useful for making wands and other ritual tools.
Household Use
The sticky berry juice has been used to catch birds, but this is illegal. It might be useful around the house where you need stickiness.
Medical Use
European Mistletoe
Mistletoe is used to lower blood pressure and for the general health of the heart and circulatory system. It is also used to treat epilepsy. For both of these, make a tea of 1 teaspoon dried leaves with one teacup of boiling water. As needed for blood pressure, and two to three times per day for epilepsy.
Compress made with this same tea can be used for rheumatism.
Mistletoe has also been indicated in the treatment of certain cancers.
American Mistletoe
Stimulates uterine contractions and can be used for suppressed menstruation and to aid in childbirth.
Cautions
Mistletoe is toxic. While you’d have to eat a lot of it to kill yourself with it, pets and small children are at a great risk. Mistletoe berries should never be taken internally.
There are many different types of mistletoe, be sure to check the botanical name before use.
Women who are pregnant or nursing should never use mistletoe!

Description

Mistletoe is a parasite that grows on larger plants, usually hardwood trees, its roots drawing nutrients from the sap of the host plant. It has lanceate green leaves and a short stem with many forks and can form a large, bushy clump hanging from the host plant up to three feet long. Plants are unisexual and greenish flowers form in clumps. White, translucent, veined berries with one seed follow.

Growing Mistletoe

The juice of the berries is very sticky and allows seeds to stick to the bark of a tree. European mistletoe prefers softer deciduous trees, especially apple trees and they are frequently found on ash and hawthorn as well. American mistletoe, called Oak mistletoe is most commonly found on maple trees, but also enjoys oak.

If you wish to grow your own mistletoe, you will need to obtain fresh berries. Squish them down onto the wood on the underside of a branch of an appropriate tree so that the juice makes the seed stick.

Some people make notches in the wood for this purpose, but how much do you want this poor tree to go through? A threadlike root will form in a few days and pierce the wood, eventually finding its way into the tree itself. You should select a large, healthy tree and a branch that will get plenty of its own sunlight. The mistletoe will take up to two years to mature.

Berries can be picked in autumn. The plant should be harvested in the winter and hung to dry and stored in a paper or cloth bag with plenty of circulation.

Alternatively, you can buy bulk mistletoe herb for magical use.

History and Folklore

Mistletoe has always been considered a magical, good luck plant. Lovers who kiss beneath it will have lasting happiness and carrying a sprig on your person will ensure good luck, protection and fertility. Hanging it in the home was supposed to protect it from disease, lightening, werewolves and having your children switched with faerie changelings.

In England and Wales, farmers gave a bunch of mistletoe to the first cow that calved to ensure the health and production of the whole heard for the year.

In Scandinavia, mistletoe was a symbol of peace under which warring parties swore truce.

According to lore, Druids held mistletoe in high esteem and collected it only when they received a vision ordering them to do so, and then with great ceremony.

Since the seeds are spread through bird droppings, our observant forebearers named Mistletoe “dung-on-twig”, (the word literally
translated is a conjugation of “birdlime” or “bird dung” and twig) believing that the plant actually sprang from the dung itself. Other beliefs held the Mistletoe grew where a tree was struck by lightening.

According to Pliny the Elder, a first century Roman Historian, described a ritual gathering of mistletoe by Gaulish Druids in his Natural History XVI as follows:

The druids – that is what they call their magicians – hold nothing more sacred than the mistletoe and a tree on which it is growing, provided it is Valonia Oak…. Mistletoe is rare and when found it is gathered with great ceremony, and particularly on the sixth day of the moon….Hailing the moon in a native word that means ‘healing all things,’ they prepare a ritual sacrifice and banquet beneath a tree and bring up two white bulls, whose horns are bound for the first time on this occasion. A priest arrayed in white vestments climbs the tree and, with a golden sickle, cuts down the mistletoe, which is caught in a white cloak. Then finally they kill the victims, praying to a god to render his gift propitious to those on whom he has bestowed it. They believe that mistletoe given in drink will impart fertility to any animal that is barren and that it is an antidote to all poisons

Mistletoe as a Yule Tradition:

Kissing under the Mistletoe originated with the Roman festival of Saturnalia. In England, kissing under the Mistletoe took place on Christmas, of course. The man must pick a berry when the kissing was complete, and once the berries were gone, there was no more kissing. The mistletoe must then be burned on the twelfth night to ensure that those who kissed under it would marry.

Throughout the Middle Ages, mistletoe was banned by the church because of its association with fertility and all of the fun debauchery that goes with it. As a substitute, holly was suggested. Even as late as the 20th century some churches did not allow people to wear mistletoe to services.

Mistletoe retained its lusty reputation, however. During the Victorian era, public displays of affection were largely frowned upon, but if you were standing under the mistletoe, you were going to get kissed. A tradition we still hold dear today.

Magical Use

Mistletoe is considered to be a plant of male energy. Indeed, the white berries are reminiscent of semen (if you imagine hard enough). It has feminine properties as well, however. It is also associated with the sun and the element of air. It is associated with the Gods Apollo,Venus, Freya, Odin and Balder.

Mistletoe is associated with both Yule and Midsummer festivals.

Use in spells to attract love, for protection, for luck while hunting, for forgiveness and reconciliation, to increase sexual potency in men and to help conceive.

It can be burned to banish unwanted spirits, laid across the threshold of the bedroom to banish unpleasant dreams, hung in the home to attract love and drive away negative influence and carried as a general protective amulet.

Its wood is useful for making wands and other ritual tools.

Household Use

The sticky berry juice has been used to catch birds, but this is illegal. It might be useful around the house where you need stickiness.

Medical Use

European Mistletoe

Mistletoe is used to lower blood pressure and for the general health of the heart and circulatory system. It is also used to treat epilepsy. For both of these, make a tea of 1 teaspoon dried leaves with one teacup of boiling water. As needed for blood pressure, and two to three times per day for epilepsy.

Compress made with this same tea can be used for rheumatism.

Mistletoe has also been indicated in the treatment of certain cancers.

American Mistletoe

Stimulates uterine contractions and can be used for suppressed menstruation and to aid in childbirth.

Cautions

Mistletoe is toxic. While you’d have to eat a lot of it to kill yourself with it, pets and small children are at a great risk. Mistletoe berries should never be taken internally.

There are many different types of mistletoe, be sure to check the botanical name before use.

Women who are pregnant or nursing should never use mistletoe!

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Sugar Lip Scrub

In the chilly months the air gets dry, and our lips suffer for it. As they get chapped, they often get covered in a layer of crusty, peeling, annoying dead skin that usually ends up getting bitten or tugged off-and that doesn’t do anybody any favors. Now your lips are bleeding and they’re sore and they are raw and soon they will be crusty again. It’s certainly a debacle, but one that I have found can be avoided by making a simple lip exfoliator.
I used to purchase my scrub, and then I realized it’s actually the easiest thing in the world to make. It’s important not to use this too much-our lips are fragile after all-but it really does the trick getting rid of all that dead peeling skin and revealing the soft skin underneath.

Ingredients:

  • pure coconut oil;
  • honey;
  • brown sugar;
  • a teaspoon;
  • a tablespoon;
  • a mixing bowl;
  • an empty jar or 2.5 oz baby food jar;
  • labels (optional);

Process:

  • Make sure that the coconut oil is solid enough to scoop up but soft enough for a spoon to dig in. If the coconut oil is too oily, stick it in the fridge for 10-20 minutes. If the coconut oil is too hard, place it into a sink filled with hot water for 5-10 minutes or until soft. Combine one well-rounded tablespoon of coconut oil with one tablespoon of honey into the bowl.
  • Mix the coconut oil and honey until they bind together. The consistency should look like thick honey-comb honey. Make sure to mash up all of the coconut lumps so that the mixture is clump-free. This will serve as the base of the scrub.
  • Add two hand packed teaspoons of brown sugar and fold it into the base.
  • Add one teaspoon of just the oil from coconut oil jar into the bowl. This will help smooth out the mixture and make the scrub extra moisturizing. Transfer the scrub from the bowl into a small jar or container.

NOTE: The edible scrub will last up to 2 weeks if refrigerated. Before using, allow the scrub to stand at room temperature for a good 10 minutes so that the formula softens a bit. Apply scrub to lips in small, circular motions for 1-2 minutes and rinse off with a warm washcloth.

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Anonimo ha chiesto: Ciao è un piacere scriverti,seguo molto il tuo blog e quello di amantedellarte,e condivido completamente quello che hai pubblicato sul suo blog;ma da laureanda in biologia devo dirti che le piante non sono dotate di cervello. Abbi un ottima giornata e continua così ;)

Ciao grazie per avermi scritto! Mi piace discutere con chi ne sa più di me su questioni che mi interessano particolarmente.

Comunque, tornando al discorso..

Per cause sconosciute, una parte dei messaggi che avevo inviato ad amantedellarte non è stata pubblicata.

Il messaggio in questione era:

-Le piante, gli alberi, i fiori… non sono anche loro esseri viventi dotati di un cervello? Hanno fatto studi (dato che vi aggrappate sempre a questi “studi”) dove viene dimostrato che certe piante sono capaci di rispondere a determinati tipi di impulsi: come la voce,
Il continuo:
la musica, le carezze ecc..ecc.. 
Perché esse hanno davvero una «testa pensante»: riflettono, si scambiano informazioni o avvertimenti, prendono decisioni.
E questo loro “cervello” segreto si trova nelle radici.
Su ogni singola punta delle radici (il nome è apice radicale) c’è, infatti, un gruppo di cellule che comunica usando neurotrasmettitori, proprio come i nostri neuroni; e queste cellule elaborano e rispondono alle informazioni che arrivano qui da tutta la pianta.
Un vero e proprio cervello diffuso, che permette agli alberi non solo di comunicare, ma persino di avere una memoria e una sorta di autocoscienza.

La scoperta è di un gruppo di ricercatori delle Università di Firenze e di Bonn e grazie a loro è nata anche una nuova scienza, la neurobiologia vegetale.

Archiviato in anon anonymous anonimo ask question herbs erbe vegetariani vegani piante plants woods nature alberi trees answer

Cute White Flying Butterfly